Commons Speaker Sir Lindsay Hoyle has said his type 1 diabetes – diagnosed at age 64 – was caused by the trauma of his daughter's death

Commons Speaker Sir Lindsay Hoyle reveals his type 1 diabetes was caused by the trauma of his daughter’s death

  • Commons Speaker Sir Lindsay Hoyle has said his type 1 diabetes was caused by the trauma of his daughter’s death
  • Sir Lindsay had just been elected Speaker in November 2019 when he found out about his health condition
  • His daughter Natalie had been found dead two years earlier and it is believed she took her own life
  • For confidential support, call the Samaritans on 116123 or visit samaritans.org 










Commons Speaker Sir Lindsay Hoyle has said his type 1 diabetes – diagnosed at age 64 – was caused by the trauma of his daughter’s death.

Sir Lindsay had just been elected Speaker in November 2019 when he found out about his health condition. His daughter Natalie had been found dead two years earlier.

He has since spoken out about her death and campaigned for more mental health support within the parliamentary estate.

Commons Speaker Sir Lindsay Hoyle has said his type 1 diabetes – diagnosed at age 64 – was caused by the trauma of his daughter’s death

‘How did I become a type 1 diabetic? Nobody will ever know but I think it was the shock of my daughter,’ he told The Daily Telegraph. 

‘Up to then, I seemed perfect. After that – the shock of that has to have an effect somewhere.’ 

Natalie was found dead in her bedroom in December 2017 in the Essex home she shared with her mother. She was 28. It is believed she took her own life.

Natalie Lewis-Hoyle (pictured) was found dead in her bedroom in December 2017 in the Essex home she shared with her mother. She was 28. It is believed she took her own life

Natalie Lewis-Hoyle (pictured) was found dead in her bedroom in December 2017 in the Essex home she shared with her mother. She was 28. It is believed she took her own life

More than four years on from Natalie's death, Sir Lindsay said the experience was 'raw' and 'still difficult' to face

More than four years on from Natalie’s death, Sir Lindsay said the experience was ‘raw’ and ‘still difficult’ to face

A coroner recorded an open verdict at the inquest, ruling there was not enough evidence that she intended to die.

Sir Lindsay faced numerous health issues during the 2019 election campaign.

He lost three stone and a consultant told him he was ‘lucky to be alive’ – but he admitted he ‘should have seen the signs’ with his diet and lifestyle.

Now he wears a monitor under his Speaker’s uniform and his chief of staff Helen Wood keeps jelly babies on hand in case his sugar levels need to be regulated.

More than four years on from Natalie’s death, Sir Lindsay said the experience was ‘raw’ and ‘still difficult’ to face. 

But he said he had an ‘advantage’ in his role as ‘there’s loads of things to do’ to distract him, if only temporarily.

However, medical experts have suggested that while stress can make diabetes control worse, there is no evidence it can trigger the disease in adults.

Professor Partha Kar, national specialty adviser for diabetes at NHS England, said: ‘There is a lot of debate about psychological stress in childhood being a potential trigger for type 1 diabetes but a large study found no evidence of this in adults.’ 

A 2004 study published in the journal Occupational Medicine concluded that ‘the concept that stress causes type 1 diabetes is no longer plausible’. 

For confidential support, call the Samaritans on 116123 or visit samaritans.org

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