Oklahoma health officials emphasize prostate cancer screenings

Oklahoma health officials are spreading the importance of early prostate cancer screenings.The American Cancer Society said that one in eight men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in their lifetime. They’re expecting 35,000 American men to die from it this year alone.These statistics are why OU Health Stephenson Cancer Center has been hosting community outreach events for men, hoping to spread the importance of early detection screenings.Herbert Goodrich knew his older brother had prostate cancer, but never thought much about it when it came to his own health until OU Health held a men’s health summit at his church.Wanting to set a good example for his fellow church members, Goodrich got screened for prostate cancer. His PSA test came back and showed signs that something might be wrong.After further testing, he found out that he had prostate cancer. After completing five treatments in the fall, Goodrich is doing well. In an OU Health interview, he said that without taking that first scary jump and getting tested, he doesn’t know where he would be today.”A lot of men my age, especially me. I was one of them, say I’m not thinking about cancer, if I go, I go. But when I heard it and actually knew that I had it, I wasn’t ready to go. I encourage every man that’s out there just listening to me that it’s better to know than not know because like my situation, had I not moved to get tested, I wouldn’t have caught it as early as I did so I’m grateful and blessed to be able to sit here today,” Goodrich said.KOCO 5 spoke with his physician, Dr. Kelly Stratton, who said that the pandemic has had a huge impact on the number of men seeking early testing.”We have seen the numbers of prostate cancer cases go down. We don’t think that means we are stopping prostate cancer from happening, we think fewer men are getting tested, fewer men are finding prostate cancer that can easily be treated and so the concern is as we look to the future, there are going to be men who may have missed an opportunity to get treatment at an earlier stage,” Stratton said.KOCO 5 asked him if he would say that early screening saves lives.”Cancers that are detected earlier may be easier to treat and may reduce the impact of prostate cancer later in life,” Stratton said.Goodrich is now just following up with his doctors. He continues to encourage men, especially those at higher risk, such as African American men and those with family history, to get early screening.

Oklahoma health officials are spreading the importance of early prostate cancer screenings.

The American Cancer Society said that one in eight men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in their lifetime. They’re expecting 35,000 American men to die from it this year alone.

These statistics are why OU Health Stephenson Cancer Center has been hosting community outreach events for men, hoping to spread the importance of early detection screenings.

Herbert Goodrich knew his older brother had prostate cancer, but never thought much about it when it came to his own health until OU Health held a men’s health summit at his church.

Wanting to set a good example for his fellow church members, Goodrich got screened for prostate cancer. His PSA test came back and showed signs that something might be wrong.

After further testing, he found out that he had prostate cancer.

After completing five treatments in the fall, Goodrich is doing well. In an OU Health interview, he said that without taking that first scary jump and getting tested, he doesn’t know where he would be today.

“A lot of men my age, especially me. I was one of them, say I’m not thinking about cancer, if I go, I go. But when I heard it and actually knew that I had it, I wasn’t ready to go. I encourage every man that’s out there just listening to me that it’s better to know than not know because like my situation, had I not moved to get tested, I wouldn’t have caught it as early as I did so I’m grateful and blessed to be able to sit here today,” Goodrich said.

KOCO 5 spoke with his physician, Dr. Kelly Stratton, who said that the pandemic has had a huge impact on the number of men seeking early testing.

“We have seen the numbers of prostate cancer cases go down. We don’t think that means we are stopping prostate cancer from happening, we think fewer men are getting tested, fewer men are finding prostate cancer that can easily be treated and so the concern is as we look to the future, there are going to be men who may have missed an opportunity to get treatment at an earlier stage,” Stratton said.

KOCO 5 asked him if he would say that early screening saves lives.

“Cancers that are detected earlier may be easier to treat and may reduce the impact of prostate cancer later in life,” Stratton said.

Goodrich is now just following up with his doctors. He continues to encourage men, especially those at higher risk, such as African American men and those with family history, to get early screening.

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